Cameron Park Real Estate

Cameron Park American River Properties

The original native American inhabitants of the area surrounding Cameron Park were Nisenan, or Southern Maidu Indians. Grinding rocks and burial mounds serve as glimpses of the past and are still visible in various locations in and near Cameron Park.

Modern development accelerated in the area when Larry Cameron purchased 5,000 acres (2,000 ha) of foothill land in the 1950s for ranching purposes. In the years since then, the land has slowly been divided into lots of varying sizes, including ranch-sized properties and medium and high density residential neighborhoods. Today, Cameron Park contains a mix of large ranches, single family homes, apartments and businesses.

Cameron Airpark Estate’s wide streets double as taxiways leading from the residences to the adjacent Cameron Park American River Propertiesairport. Many homes have aircraft hangars (oversized garages) that house personal aircraft, allowing residents to commute from home to work entirely by air. The adjoining airport (Cameron Airpark, O61) is a public airport and of economic importance to the surrounding region.

Adjacent to the Airpark Estates sits man-made Cameron Park Lake. Covering approximately 10 acres (4 ha), the area contains a trail encircling the lake, picnic areas, boat rentals, tennis courts, playgrounds, as well as a sandy beach and swimming area separated from the main lake by an earthen dam. Turtles and aquatic fowl can be seen at the lake, and the Community Services District regularly stocks the lake with fish including bluegill, black bass, and black crappie fish. Cameron Park Lake is also the site of the annual “Summer Spectacular” held on or about the Independence Day holiday. Since 1999 this event has provided entertainment, food, and a fireworks show to attendees. Cameron Park Lake is also the home of “Ribstock,” a one-day barbecue festival that features a Kansas City Barbeque Society-sanctioned barbecue competition.

Cameron Park was once known as the home of “Sam’s Town”, where many travelers stopped on their way to and from Lake Tahoe. This restaurant and amusement complex was located along Highway 50, but was torn down in 2002 and is now a “ForkLift Gocery” store, part of the Nugget Markets chain. All that remains is a plaque noting its former existence.

Parts of the Skinner Vineyard and Winery from the early 1860s can be seen at the intersection of Green Valley Road and Cameron Park Drive. All that is left of Skinner’s ranch is a portion of the cellar (integrated into the Cameron Park Nursery on the northeast corner of the intersection), a tiny remnant of the distillery wall (behind mobile homes in the mobile home park near the southeast corner of the intersection), and the Skinner cemetery (near the south-west corner of the intersection). The cemetery contains the graves of James and Jessie Skinner (née Bernard) and three of their sons. The cemetery is located on a small hill just west of the intersection behind a pizza restaurant. Only remnants of a few headstones and fence remain due to the effects of time and vandalism. There are several other “pioneer” cemeteries located throughout Cameron Park.